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14 days of Ubuntu

I’m a long time OSS fan: I’ve been using and recommending Firefox from when it was called Phoenix, OpenOffice.org since its StarOffice days, and The GIMP since version 1.0 or so. I also frequently use VLC, Inkscape, Miranda IM, TortoiseSVN, Hugin and of course, WordPress. So, with all the Ubuntu fanboyism going on these days, I decided to install Ubuntu 6.06 on my 2 year old Toshiba Dynabook CX: the installation was a breeze — my CX was suddenly sexy again. And surprise, surprise: in contrast with earlier Linux installation attempts, everything worked out of the box. That is, almost everything… Some things needed additional tweaking (1). And more tweaking. And more. And in some cases, I simply gave up (2).

So, let me first start with (1), the additional tweaks. What follows is an extensive list of Ubuntu howtos/links I found helpful, including a tutorial I wrote myself. For my own and your reference:

  • EasyUbuntu: painless installation of video codecs, libdvdcss, flash, rar support and MS core fonts.
  • The Unofficial Ubuntu 6.06 (Dapper Drake) Starter Guide is a must-have bookmark. I used it for installing Adobe Reader, VLC, Wine, Opera, etc.
  • Picasa: follow the instructions.
  • Skype: don’t install 1.2 (it won’t work), but live on the cutting edge: go with the 1.3 Beta instead.
  • Interesting for web developers and masochists: install IE5, 5.5 and 6 on Ubuntu.
  • Register Gmail as your default mail client.
  • Add a Last.fm protocol handler in Firefox. For use with the amazing Amarok 1.4.1.
  • We’ve already installed the MS Core fonts with EasyUbuntu. Here’s how we can make them prettier (autohinting).
  • Fix an error in the keyboard layout. Find out your changes are reverted everytime you reboot. Then make the fix run automatically at startup.
  • Activate Japanese through System>Administration>Language Support. If you’re not very fond (haha!) of Ubuntu’s Japanese font rendering, this fine optimization guide will come in handy. I believe it disables some of the earlier mentioned autohint enhancements though.
  • A guide I wrote myself: how to enable Japanese font support in Adobe Reader.
  • Two other links worth bookmarking: How to install anything in Ubuntu and Root Access with sudo and gksudo.
  • Google Earth instructions on this page. If it doesn’t work (it didn’t for me), install Aiglx+Compiz (see below) and try again.
  • Excellent instructions for installing Aiglx+Compiz on the Dynabook CX (or other systems with an Intel Graphics Card). Update 2006-09-03: as of last week, this method is broken. You can update earlier Aiglx+Compiz installations by following these instructions. If you start from scratch, this new guide seems to offer the solution. An overview of the default shortcuts can be found on the Compiz site. Drool away.
  • Update 2006-08-22: the default compiz window theme can be changed by installing the CGWD Themer and activating CGWD instead of gnome-window-decorator. Worked for me by adding “cgwd” to the Startup Programs tab under System>Preferences>Session. I’m currently using a blend of Murrine Metacity + Murrina Gtk Color Schemes + Tango-Style icon mod (see Gnome Themes for more) with the Kiwi CGWD theme. Very relaxing.
  • Update 2006-08-22: as suggested, I looked into cpufreq. Here’s a guide that explains what it is and how you can use it. I usually set the “governor” to “conservative” and switch to a fixed frequency (e.g. 800 MHz) when playing a movie or watching a YouTube video. Works great so far — the temperature is still higher than on XP, but no extreme jumps anymore.
  • Update 2006-08-22: in order to boost performance, I followed refactored.net’s and Arve’s suggestion and installed a 686 processor specific kernel and the “official” Intel 815/852/855 graphic drivers. Slightly better, no extreme improvements though.
  • Update 2006-08-21: keeping the best speed tweak for the last — be sure to have a look at the Swiftfox project, which distributes processor optimized Firefox builds. Unnecessary, I thought, but I’m blown away by the result: my Pentium M optimized Swiftfox has replaced the default Firefox install. Sound in flash was broken again, but I found a quick fix: instead of launching Swiftfox with a simple “swiftfox” command, I use “aoss /usr/bin/swiftfox” — flash works great now, even without the 1 second time delay mentioned earlier!!
  • Update 2006-08-21: Aptana: this Japanese howto gave me the idea to try launching Aptana as ./aptana and indeed, suddenly things worked. With the help of this thread, I wrote a small script for launching Aptana from the start menu. Script looks like this:
    #!/bin/bash
    cd /home/USERNAME/Aptana
    export MOZILLA_FIVE_HOME=/usr/lib/mozilla
    ./aptana
    I placed the script in /usr/bin and linked to it from the start menu. For a nice Aptana Icon, check out this thread.

So far so good.

Then over to (2): the stuff that is and remains broken.

  • Skype 1.3 beta sort of works, but the signal is far from optimal. Gtalk replacement Tapioca has similar problems, but I have no idea how to fix it.
  • Google Earth and Picasa both work, but with a certain delay (even at low quality settings). Jerkily moving images aren’t pretty to look at.
  • Metacity is stable but looks boring, Compiz is great but has its bugs.
  • Flash animations and movies work, but there’s no sound. You can fix this, but then you’re stuck with a 1 sec time delay. Also: CPU usage always hovers around 100% when opening a flash file.
  • Video works better than I thought, but also here: serious CPU usage issues. DVD playback is partly broken: no access to menus or subtitles, no forwarding or rewinding either.
  • Bluetooth doesn’t work. Built-in SD slot isn’t recognized.
  • Beagle is a fine search tool, but it’s definitely no Google Desktop Search. Doesn’t find the files I expect it to find.
  • Aptana, my last hope in my quest for a decent auto-suggest enabled CSS editor, doesn’t work for some reason or another. And yes, I did the extra required steps.
  • I probably haven’t searched enough, but I can’t find a TortoiseSVN like tool for Gnome. There are Nautilus scripts, but they definitely can’t stand the comparison with TortoiseSVN. Update 2006-08-21: Not very impressed with the suggested eSvn. Using the command line for the time being.
  • No Suspend nor Sleep functionality. Shut down + restart is the only option. Update 2006-08-21: refactored.net suggested installing “hibernate”. Done, but the problem remains: switching to hiberate mode is no problem, waking up is. A forced restart is usually all that is left.
  • Sudden 100% CPU peaks: checking the system monitor usually doesn’t make me any wiser (= the percentages displayed do not add up to 100).
  • The temperature!! According to my CPU Frequency Scaling Monitor, the CPU temperature starts at around 45 degrees (bootup), only to move up quickly to 70, 80, sometimes even +90 degrees. This results in an unpleasantly warm keyboard and a continuously noisy fan. Annoying. After playing around with cpufreq, I have the CPU~temperature combo somewhat under control. Still too warm though.

So, although Ubuntu is the best Linux distro I’ve used so far, there are still some clear defects that I don’t know how to deal with (other than filing bugs and waiting for updates).

To me, Ubuntu has no real benefits over XP at this point. Yes, there’s the powerful command line, a better security model, a couple of nice Linux-only apps (like Amarok), and if you want, the OSS ideology, but still — I want to start getting things done after a while. An XP reinstall isn’t far away, to be honest… We’re slowly gettin’ there… ;-)

Comments on “14 days of Ubuntu” (feed)

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  1. If you just want an editor for CSS, I’d suggest that Aptana is a bit heavy. SciTE has autocomplete, and while it takes a Ctrl-Enter to bring up completion suggestions, it does the job fairly well. (And if you really want a complete web IDE, Aptana also works reasonably well as an Eclipse plug-in.)

    As for your video and graphics performance problems, I’d suggest trying the appropriate proprietary/vendor-supplied driver for your graphics card as the open source versions that are installed by default leave much to be desired

    Finally, for svn, I’d suggest eSvn (I think you might have to enable the universe repository for this). It’s still no TortoiseSVN, but it provides a much better svn experience than any of the available Nautilus scripts. Eclipse also provides options for working with repositories, see http://subclipse.tigris.org/

    » Arve on August 17th, 2006 at 16:41

  2. “No Suspend nor Sleep functionality. Shut down + restart is the only option.”

    Try searching for “hibernate” in synaptic. Once that’s in there you should be ok.

    As for the temperature, check out the ubuntu forum. You probably just need to sort out your scaling. I had the same problem, but after playing the cpufreqd and powernowd (or something) I managed to get it running quiet and cool.

    Your random CPU peaks could be due to logging or HDD usage – try reducing the number of logs generated and use hdparm to spin down your HDD after, say, 5 mins.

    There are lots of other hints for laptop users. I’m compiling them as I go (I’m a recent Ubuntu convert too) and hope to put a HowTo up in the forums.

    » refactored.net on August 17th, 2006 at 17:01

  3. Also, make sure you’ve got the right kernel for you system. I’m running an AMD sempron, so I use the linux-k7 kernel. Check whether you should switch.

    And as Arve suggested, make sure you’re running the right drivers for things. My system was a dog until I installed the right ATI drivers, and you could see the performance difference afterwards.

    » refactored.net on August 17th, 2006 at 17:04

  4. I have been running Ubuntu Drapper on a old compaq box for sometime now. Though everything works like a breeze still it isn’t the best way to get things done, as you said. Didn’t uninstall it though, don’t want the sexiness to go yet :D

    » Asela on August 17th, 2006 at 17:25

  5. Just to explain to what extent the graphics drivers impacts performance. I have a (personal, non-released) canvas animation testcase running. With the open-source drive for Nvidia chipsets, I get 5 fps. After updating to Nvidia’s own driver, speed increases to between 25 and 30 fps. On my less dated laptop with an ATI GPU, I go from 15 to 60fps.

    » Arve on August 17th, 2006 at 18:12

  6. Thanks for the tips (and keep ’em coming)! I’m definitely going to try out your suggestions (glad I left that XP CD in its box yesterday evening).

    » Andreas on August 17th, 2006 at 18:28

  7. Maybe you should allso check out Kubuntu (http://www.kubuntu.org).
    Thats ubuntu but instead of gnome it uses kde.
    Personally I like kde better, I think it looks better and is less difficult to work with. Kde allso has a build in svn client that acts a lot like TortoiseSvn (http://www.alwins-world.de/programs/kdesvn/snapshots).
    I never installed Kubuntu but I did use other kde oriented linux distributions (Open Suse).
    The current flash version for linux is pretty buggy but version 9 wil be released soon which should be better (http://weblogs.macromedia.com/emmy/archives/2006/05/yes_virginia_th.cfm).

    » Johannes on August 17th, 2006 at 18:33

  8. Linux is great. I love Open Source Software too, but don’t use a linux distro yet just because my wacom tablet does not have a driver for linux, and every tutorial that I’ve tryed seems to work for everybody except for me.

    One day I’ll have the pleasure to use a linux, with my tablet, my printer, scanner, video card, photoshop, illustrator, indesign, acrobat and version cue working fine, and without a emulating software!

    » rafael apocalypse on August 21st, 2006 at 23:03

  9. “After playing around with cpufreq, I have the CPU~temperature combo somewhat under control. Still too warm though.”

    Though I mentioned cpufreq, it didn’t work for me. I ended up with powernowd or whatever it is. It was a straight synaptic install (which removed cpufreq), and everythings fine. I often get hot periods, but that tends to be when I’m surfing the web in bed on a sunday morning and the duvet is covering up the fan.

    Do a synaptic search for “power” or “cpu” and see what you get. Remember, YMMV.

    Another tip is to do a search in synaptic for the word “laptop”. There are lots of little tools and daemons you can install which will keep a check on things. I think there was a laptop-mode package, which tweaks everything to get your system running cooler, too.

    On the plus side, doing all the power tweaks has meant a battery time for me of 2.5hrs, when the factory specs say all I can expect is a measly 1.5hrs.

    Also, heading over to the Ubuntu forums to check out the HowTo section. There’s lots of stuff in there which adds stability and candy, both of which are useful.

    I especially found the HowTo for installing conky useful. It shows me what my laptop is getting upto under the hood. With a few tweaks I got my wifi usage monitored next to my eth0.

    “DVD playback is partly broken: no access to menus or subtitles, no forwarding or rewinding either.”

    That all depends on what packages you’re using. I’ve not had a problem using MoviePlayer to run my DVDs and can navigate the menus fine, whereas I’m having no luck with VLC (my fav player on win). Again, synaptic might be able to help. I normally search for something simple (subtitle) and see what comes back. It might just be something you have to add on over the top of an already installed app.

    “Bluetooth doesn’t work.”

    Is it a built-in feature for the laptop? Have you installed all the Bluez packages? My generic (£10) bluetooth dongle worked flawlessly, once I’d installed all the right packages, and I can easily backup my phone (K800i) using multisync.

    “Built-in SD slot isn’t recognized.”

    Oh. No idea with this one. I’d search though or post something on ubuntuforums.org.

    “Not very impressed with the suggested eSvn. Using the command line for the time being.”

    TBH, thats probably a good thing. I’m by no means a linux guru, but I’m spending more and more time on the command line. Once you know the basics, you can do some really time-saving operations. I’ve been using Windows for 10 years and don’t know DOS, linux for 2 and I’m more than comfortable on a headless system.

    “switching to hiberate mode is no problem, waking up is.”

    Sorry about that. I don’t use hibernate much. I’m more than happy to just shutdown my machine. But again, try the UbuntuForums. There area plenty of people having the same issues, and I’m sure there will be a fix.

    What you’ve got to remember about the hardware stuff is that because of microsoft’s monopoly most hardware is designed for windows. So they either use windows generic drivers, download drivers directly from microsoft, or come packaged with windows-specific drivers. The OSS community is fighting hard to get built-in support for the most common hardware, but its a difficult battle. Especially with little support from vendors, and the amount of odd hardware people like to use. You just need to work a little harder to get things working. The benefit of which is that you’ll get to understand the inner-workings of it all, which will get you out of problems in the future.

    Just imagine the problems you’d have trying to install windows 95 on your laptop, and finding all the drivers and programs to run your hardware! At least with linux you’ve got a fighting chance and a helpful community! ;)

    » refactored.net on August 23rd, 2006 at 21:56

  10. Wow, I make way more money with my Mac than it’s worth the time to sit there and figure out how to make my Mac do basic, menial tasks that I’ve paid Apple a small amount to do for me. You must not make much money for it to be worth all your time to screw with Ubuntu all this time. When are you nerds going to start to keep track, record, analyze and VALUE your time???

    » Cowicide on August 30th, 2006 at 06:53

  11. Cowicide: Maybe its just that we “nerds” like to know what our machines are doing in the background. Why do certain people play with engines to get the most power out of their car? Why do designers tweak their designs after they’ve “finished”? More often than not its not because we have to, but because we *can*. ;)

    » refactored.net on August 30th, 2006 at 20:50

  12. […] References: Linux Ubuntu Dapper (6.06 LTS) on a Dell Latitude D800 (just scroll down) This wonderfull comment by refactored.net […]

    » andriy drozdyuk » Blog Archive » Hibernate not working in Ubuntu 6 on September 4th, 2006 at 16:05

  13. Use Eclipse with the Web Tools (http://www.eclipse.org/webtools/), it contains (X)HTML CSS and Javascript editor/validator, and you can install the Subclipse SVN plugin (http://subclipse.tigris.org/) to use a GUI for SVN with the projects you work on.

    » Sebhelyesfarku on September 7th, 2006 at 18:33

  14. Cowicide: pull your head out of Jobs’ arse and check out the fresh air outside

    » Sebhelyesfarku on September 7th, 2006 at 18:42

  15. “… Why do certain people play with engines to get the most power out of their car? …”

    Because they are jackasses with alcohol problems.

    “… Why do designers tweak their designs after they’ve “finished”? …”

    Because some designers don’t know when to quit and overwork or overproduce a project.

    “… Cowicide: pull your head out of Jobs’ arse and check out the fresh air outside …”

    Thanks, but I already get plenty of fresh air outside because I’m not inside screwing with my computer just so it can recognize a mouse. ;P

    » Cowicide on September 8th, 2006 at 13:11

  16. That’s the nice thing about Mactards Cowicide, they think they breath fresh air outside with their heads firmly up in Jobs’ arse. RDF from the rectum.

    » Sebhelyesfarku on September 11th, 2006 at 00:48

  17. Cowicide, it’s called curiosity. I know that some of the Mac guys don’t know what their PC is doing and why it is doing what it is doing. But for me (and apparently many others) this just doesn’t suffice. I want to know what happens inside my PC and I want to tweak it until it does exactly what I want. Right, if you just want to use your PC then do it but stop feeling superior to people “screwing with their PC just so it can recognize a mouse”. If your PC suddently decided to go b0rken, you wouldn’t know shit. Most probably you’d call the mac customer service. And the PC is gone… I prefer to know what’s happening…
    greetings
    jeeger

    P.S.: Read the entry for M– http://www.ecs.csun.edu/~dsalomon/geek.html

    » jeeger on September 11th, 2006 at 02:20

  18. > That’s the nice thing about Mactards Cowicide, they think
    > they breath fresh air outside with their heads firmly up in
    > Jobs’ arse. RDF from the rectum.

    No, I literally get fresh air… from outdoors while your pasty ass rots away trying to get your mouse to work.

    » Cowicide on September 13th, 2006 at 20:22

  19. > Cowicide, it’s called curiosity. I know that some of the
    > Mac guys don’t know what their PC is doing and why it is
    > doing what it is doing. But for me (and apparently many
    > others) this just doesn’t suffice. I want to know what
    > happens inside my PC and I want to tweak it until it does
    > exactly what I want.

    Jackass, it’s called UNIX. Any Mac users that cares enough to get “curious” and want to tinker are welcome to it. The difference is… you don’t HAVE to in order to get basic functionality. Ubuntu is no “Mac killer” as a good percentage of you seem to think.

    > Right, if you just want to use your PC then do it but stop
    > feeling superior to people “screwing with their PC just so
    > it can recognize a mouse”.

    OK, I’ll stop feeling “superior”, right? So, when are you guys going to try that yourselves? Apparently, anyone who uses a Mac is a “tard”, doesn’t know UNIX.. Oh yeah, and if thier Mac breaks… oh, I’ll let you finish… something about… “I wouldn’t know shit”, right?

    > If your PC suddently decided to go b0rken, you wouldn’t
    > know shit. Most probably you’d call the mac customer
    > service. And the PC is gone… I prefer to know what’s
    > happening…

    Years I’ve used Macs: Almost 19 years
    Macs owned: 9
    Customer service phone calls: 0
    Originial Mac: Still works fine (but a bit slow)
    Crashes since OS X Panther &&& Tiger: ZERO, NONE.
    Work done: Massive amounts in very little time.

    If (hahaha, yeah right) my mouse stopped working on my Mac all of the sudden, I would restart the Mac with the shift-key held down, then reboot again and get back to work… finish work early.. get fresh air.

    Sorry, once again… I like fresh air… if I want to tinker, there’s UNIX and more.

    I hope Ubuntu blossums, but don’t fool yourselves into thinking it’s better than Mac. You’re delusional. Oh yes.. DRM… sigh… Yeah, there’s no getting around DRM on Macs… Hahahaha… yeah, right…

    » Cowicide on September 13th, 2006 at 20:39

  20. This is not a troll. So without the juvenile name calling, I have to agree with some of the idiot’s points. Curiosity is great. Knowing how a system runs is great, car or computer. Being able to infinitely customize a system is great, but so is having it all just work right out of the box.

    I use a Mac for my everyday work; yes, I’m a designer. I’ve also kept a Linux box running for the last five years, mostly because I love the idea of not being tied into one company’s monopoly, Mac or Windows. The theory of Linux is terriffic. I do run a development server on it but I could do that on my Mac.

    But Linux is a lot of work and there are very few truly cool Linux consumer apps. Well, yeah, I have my own custom Apache server set up just the way I want, but that is hardly a consumer friendly program.

    Most Linux consumer programs are playing catchup with Windows, which is playing catchup with Mac for user friendliness. I do use a couple of excellent open source programs everyday, Firefox and Adium. But I can use those programs on any computer.

    The Gimp? Only a geek could love the Gimp. I worked for a Linux based newspaper for a couple of years and secretly had a Crossover Office version of Photoshop that I did my real work in when the boss wasn’t looking. Running a print based design shop with an RGB design program was a lot of work to put out for an idea. And having a complex program that was created by a committee makes for a lot of klutziness.

    Open Office? It’s okay but still just a copy playing catchup. Usable? Absolutely. Elegant? Hardly. Oh, I guess I have some good Og Vorbis options but who offers music in that format? And what about my iPod?

    I’m impressed with how the new Gnome desktop looks but under the pretty face it’s still not as consistent as the commercial OS’s. It’s usable now but for someone who is more interested in everything just working, it isn’t quite there yet.

    Then there’s laptop power management. Do I need to spend precious hours or days perusing forums to find an obscure set of commands to do what I can do with a couple of clicks elsewhere? Don’t get me started on video or photo editing.

    Right now, desktop Linux is either for the enthusiast who is comfortable in a text editor and does most of his or her work there, or the absolute novice computer user who only needs to run email and write a couple of letters and surf the web.

    For the vast mass of us in the middle, it just isn’t compelling enough to send the considerable amount of time it takes to get things working smoothly. There is more than one kind of cost. I’m willing to play money to Steve to gain back the cost of productivity that just isn’t there yet in Linux.

    » michael on September 18th, 2006 at 01:58

  21. […] 14 Days of Ubuntu […]

    » geek ramblings » Drinking the Ubuntu Kool-Aid on September 19th, 2006 at 05:44

  22. I’ve also made the switch and I’m loving it. Like everyone else I’ve had a few things that needed tweaked but I’m really loving it.

    » The FriedGeek on October 31st, 2006 at 02:57

  23. Are you still using only Ubuntu Linux or shifted to WinXP. Or do you use a dual boot? Please reply. Thanks.

    » Anderson on December 17th, 2006 at 13:05

  24. Anderson, I switched back to XP a while ago.

    2 reasons: Compiz updates broke things three times in a single week, resulting in a lot of headaches just to get everything working again + the temperature/ventilation problem described above.

    How about you?

    » Andreas on December 19th, 2006 at 01:39

  25. thankz. i am dual booting xp and ubuntu. i am learning daily. i am also documenting things. linux may become more popular like firefox in the future. but till then windows will rule.

    » Anderson on December 19th, 2006 at 02:16

  26. About the temperature problems, try linux-phc its functionality is similar to centrino hardware control (windows tool). These tools lower the core voltage of your pentium-M processor, resulting in less heat production.
    The best method is running NHC under windows to figure out your minimum core voltage. Then use the same voltages in PHC.

    Notebook hardware control:
    http://www.pbus-167.com/

    Linux-PHC:
    https://www.dedigentoo.org/trac/linux-phc/
    http://gentoo-wiki.com/HOWTO_Undervolt_a_Pentium_M_CPU
    The wiki is for gentoo, but it works fine under ubuntu (I tested dapper& edgy)

    » Dogmatica on December 24th, 2006 at 23:04

  27. Cowicide you Macfaggot, stop suckin’ Jobs’ dick. Are you really retarded to think that an installed Linux doesn’t recognise the mouse? Mactard, most standard hardware components will be recognised. The difference between Linux and OS X is that the former has to work on thousands of different hardware configurations and the latter works only on one – that you buy from Apple, Maczealot. You want to use a different Bluetooth card with a chipset that different from the one that OS X supports? It won’t be recognised, Macfag. That’s called closed system, asswipe. Apple’s way or the highway, you brainwashed Maclot. But obviously you like this way even enjoy it, especially when jerking off to a Jobs’ keynote on Mac Expo.

    » Sebhelyesfarku on January 5th, 2007 at 22:30

  28. cowicide, even windows is better than mac, and since ubuntu is better than windows (unless you just play games)…nuff said

    » highlander49ca on January 12th, 2007 at 22:20

  29. Sebhelyesfarku? When’s the last time you felt the touch of a woman?

    highlander49ca? That’s a troll move… won’t work on me. Debating whether or not Macs are better than Windows is like debating Global Warming. There no longer is a real debate about it with intelligent ppl.

    » Cowicide on January 29th, 2007 at 18:49

  30. cowicide, your mom has just finished a blowjob for me, you inbred Mactard.

    » Sebhelyesfarku on February 24th, 2007 at 16:49

  31. > your mom has just finished a blowjob for me

    Well, I’m glad to see she finished the blowjob that you started. I guess you were too busy trying to get your mouse to work with Ubuntu to perform the happy ending?

    » Cowicide on July 2nd, 2007 at 17:08

  32. Cowicide, Sebhelyesfarku – you guys are priceless…

    » Andreas on July 2nd, 2007 at 23:56

  33. cowicide, your faggot beggar dad started that blowjob. And the mouse still works on Ubuntu, ya asswipe Macturd. French kiss your black turtlenecked Master’s arse, cretin.

    » Sebhelyesfarku on August 3rd, 2007 at 19:54

  34. […] is just a simple comment that I found on this website when researching about some Ubuntu […]

    » e - m o j o » little comment about nerds on August 13th, 2007 at 23:30

  35. Hey, you striped through “Sudden 100% CPU peaks: checking the system monitor usually doesn’t make me any wiser (= the percentages displayed do not add up to 100).”
    but hasn’t given any explanation?

    I get 100% CPU peaks in Aptana – probably because of the code assist feature or something, and wondered if you’ve solved it.

    I guess you’ll be back in Ubuntu when the next spyware raid demolishes your XP’s usefullness. Welcome in a matter of weeks! :)

    » Motin on November 2nd, 2007 at 04:49